Its primary goal is to reduce droughts and floods and create 35 million hectares of arable land in the procedure, along with the means to generate 34,000 megawatts of hydropower.

Its primary goal is to reduce droughts and floods and create 35 million hectares of arable land in the procedure, along with the means to generate 34,000 megawatts of hydropower.

Than it'll do great but environmental specialists are concerned the initiative will do much more harm to India.

First, they claim, it needs to be taken into account that climate change has caused changes in rain patterns with unpredictable effects and that placing in stone a tremendous new canal network at such an unstable interval wouldn’t be a wise choice.

"What may seem as water deficient now may become water surplus in the future as a result of climate change," said Sachin Gunthe of Indian Institute of Technology in Madras, as cited by New Scientist. "So, how can you justify inter linking?"

And while the initiative is targeted at reducing floods, it totally disregards the reality that flood carries huge volumes of silt which helps reduce coastal erosion.

What’s more, the ILR scheme will demand to assemble vast reservoirs to store and control water, by manager of Delhi-based NGO, the Centre for Science and Environment, Sunita Narain, and these reservoirs will displace hundreds of tens of thousands of men and women.

Wildlife will even seriously suffer, as even the scheme’s pilot project would just be possible at the cost of destroying an estimated 4,100 hectares of woods, likely including 58 square kilometres of the Panna Tiger Reserve.

Despite all of the alerts by environmental activists, the government appears determined, and work on the pilot-link is not unlikely to start any time soon.

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