He was a physicist, botanist, as well as an author during his life—all this even though he wasn't allowed access under the racist British rule to science labs.

They don’t make them like Jagadish Chandra Bose.

He was a physicist, botanist, as well as an author during his life—all this even though he wasn't allowed access under the racist British rule to science labs.

A Google Doodle on the other side of the USA, Australia, India, and France is commemorating his contributions 158 years after he was born.

The famous scientist is deemed the father of wireless communication. He also invented the Mercury Coherer, a radio wave receiver that was afterwards used by Guglielmo Marconi to assemble the primary working transatlantic two-way radio that was not incapable of communicating across 2,000 miles.

That’s not all.

Life in plants

In middle school biology, all of US learn about plants feel respire, and procreate, much like humans do. These biological facts, which we suppose with no thought, were not once known. And these were the focus of Bose’s plant physiology research. For showing that plants have, he takes the credit.

Employing a crescograph, a measuring tool he devised to monitor growth in plants by magnifying the process by 10,000 times, Bose demonstrated they'd have nervous systems. He discovered that their growth is altered according to distinct stimulation: enjoyable sounds spurred it while rigorous ones retarded it. He went to analyse plant tissues react to chemical inhibitors seasonal changes, temperature variations and more — to all show that they “ feel pain and comprehend fondness.”

Science and sci-fi

In his almost 80 years, Bose the polymath also pioneered the sci-fi genre in Bengali literature. In 1896, he published the novel Niruddesher Kahini (Story of the Untraceable) which tells readers how a bottle of hair oil might be used to redirect a cyclone.

Even after the Doodle is not any longer on Google’s landing page, Bose’s name will live on—on the world and beyond. A lunar crater of 91 kilometres diameter was christened “The Bose Crater” in honour of Bose, who was also knighted in 1917. It is adjacent to Crater Bhabha, dedicated father of the Indian atomic energy programme, to Homi Jehangir Bhabha.

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